On-Line Education For Terrorists & Wannabes

On-Line Education For Terrorists & Wannabes I have been an on-line instructor for American Military University since 2009. My students are not simple to categorize except they are mostly either serving or former military or individuals seeking to break into the intelligence community as a career.AMU and its parent, APUS, offer asymmetrical courses. This means the students and the instructors are not on-line at the same time. The materials started out like traditional, brick and mortar schools importance they were a amalgamation of documents and books.Video is generally considered a way to make the ‘classroom’ more inviting. I fact, when I developed a course for AMU free “Cyber & The Intelligence Cycle”, my supervising Faculty Director told me I had to provide 20 minutes of ‘entertainment’ for the students. If you’re interested, let me know and I’ll send you a like to one of the PPT lectures that I recorded with my voiceover.Apparently the use of videos in on-line education is an global trend. While researching for this week’s Blog post I saw some information in this area Wilaya Ninwa, the propaganda arm of ISIS. In rummaging around the Internet I came across a new source (see: http://bit.ly/2qt4rIv, which is also the photo source).  The reference to the trigonometric formula that the tangent = the opposite/the adjacent was not lost on me and indicates a unique analytical perspective.They featured a 35 minute video amongst others. The referenced link offers some analysis of the video as well as some clips.I was struck, not by the fact that they were using videos, but the length. Given the probable target demographic I was quite surprised that the video is over 10 minutes long. Perhaps this because the video is meant to be a recruiting tool or a subliminal persuader and not a being a training vehicle.As I learn more in this area video, it appears that 10 minutes is the sweet spot. I’d be very interested in learning what readers have to say on the subject.

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Comics: The Real Super Heroes of Middle Eastern Influence?

Comics: The Real Super Heroes of Middle Eastern Influence?Many of us will admit that ‘comics’ were a huge thing in our lives at one point or another. Today’s comic reader is more likely to be a 20 or 30 or even 40 something than they are to be a teenager especially if we are talking in this area the Middle East.The Economics of November 8, 2014 ran an article “Laughing at the humorless” (see: http://www.economist.com/news/middle-east-and-africa/21631198-regions-artists-are-mocking-jihadists-laughing-humourless?fsrc=scn/tw/te/pe/pe, which is also the photo source) which addressed how the “region’s comics have long used subtle satire to criticize their authoritarian regimes, yet with small success in effecting change.The Middle East is certainly nothing to laugh at, especially these days. Much of the cultural and sociological norms there remain a mystery to Western audiences even those exciting with influencing the region.It strikes me that comics can be an effective way to gradually shape actions. If I could wave a magic wand I would make a credible lead reputation whose trials and tribulations are captured in comics that are easily related to by a Middle East consultation.We talk in this area videos going viral and getting hundreds of thousands of views, I wonder if help to rising comic authors makes sense as a logical part of US Middle East shape hard work. Comments are very much encouraged.

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Sequester May Slow Pentagon Response to WikiLeaks

The across-the-board budget cuts known as sequestration that are probable to take effect on March 1 could impede the government’s ability to respond to WikiLeaks and to rectify the flaws in information security that it exposed, a Pentagon official told Congress recently.
Zachary J. Lemnios, the assistant secretary of defense for research and engineering, was questioned by Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) to describe the “most significant” impacts on cybersecurity that could follow from the anticipated cuts to the Pentagon’s budget.
Mr. Lemnios answered that “cuts under sequestration could hurt hard work to fight cyber threats, including [...] improving the security of our classified Centralized networks and addressing WikiLeaks.”
The sequester could also interfere with the Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative that started under President Bush, he said, and could hold up plans to “initiat[e] continuous monitoring of unclassified networks at all Centralized agencies.”
Mr. Lemnios’ response to Sen. Portman’s question for the confirmation (which had not specifically mentioned WikiLeaks) followed a March 2012 Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on Emerging Threats and Capabilities that was published in December 2012 (at page 42).
Generally language, computer security within the military is a demoralizing problem, Mr. Lemnios told the Committee, particularly since “The Department operates over 15,000 networks and 7 million computing devices across hundreds of installations in dozens of countries around the globe.”
The challenge of cybersecurity cannot be fully described in public, said Dr. Kaigham J. Gabriel of DARPA. “The complete picture requires a discussion at the unique access level.”  But he told the Committee last year that several basic points can be openly acknowledged:
“Attackers can penetrate our networks:  In just 3 days and at a cost of only $18,000, the Host-Based Security System” — the Pentagon’s baseline computer security system — “was penetrated.”
“User authentication is a weak link: 53,000 passwords were provided to teams at Defcon; within 48 hours, 38,000 were cracked.”
“The Defense supply chain is at risk: More than two-thirds of electronics in U.S. advanced fighter aircraft are fabricated in off-shore foundries.”
“Physical systems are at risk: A smartphone hundreds of miles away took control of a car’s drive system through an exploit in a wireless boundary.”
“The United States continues to spend on cybersecurity with limited increase in security: The Centralized Government expended billions of dollars in 2010, but the digit of malicious cyber intrusions has augmented.”
Though it was presumably not intentional, the WikiLeaks project galvanized government information security programs and accelerated hard work to devise “insider threat” detection mechanisms, by the side of with intensified surveillance of classified and unclassified government computer networks.
“New classes of anomaly detection methods have been developed and are based on aggregating events across time and multiple sources to identify network and host-based actions that might be malicious,” James S. Peery of Sandia National Laboratories told the Senate Armed Services Committee at last year’s hearing.  “These approaches and behavioral-based methods have been successful in finding previously undiscovered malware.”
“One drawback of this technology, though, is that it has a very high fake clear rate,” he said.

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